Mostly in Pictures: Journey to the Northwest Highlands.

Sunset July 18, Achnasheen, Poolew, Ross-Shire.

From July 17 through 24 2020, our family took a vacation in the Scottish Northwest Highlands. We originally booked a holiday cottage in Gairloch for the week before(July 4 through 11) but the government lock-down owing to the COVID-19 pandemic quickly put paid to that plan. As luck would have it though, the same firm we booked the cottage through offered us another accommodation in the neighbouring village of Poolewe, just six miles from Gairloch for the following week, when shops and restaurants were allowed to open up. Having spent months at home, we naturally jumped at the chance!

The Northwest Highlands is not a place you would want to go for warm summer weather. But for natural beauty and a place to contemplate God’s glorious creation, I can’t think of a better place. The cottage we secured was spacious and comfortable with a large and well maintained garden. There was no internet connection – not even a telephone signal – but after months of the kids sat behind computer screens during the lockdown, it was exactly what the doctor ordered; a place where we could fully re-connect as a family and cast away our anxieties about all the dark events happening in the world.

The cottage, Poolewe.

The village itself only has about 200 inhabitants, many of which are retired couples who have sold up from the cities and moved here to enjoy their autumn years.

This part of the British Isles(57.7 degrees north latitude)  is renowned for its beautiful, pristine beaches and unspoiled coastline, making it a favourite haunt for birders and other nature lovers. In mid July, dark night time skies are out of the question owing to strong twilight. The weather forecast didn’t bode well for star gazing during this week either, so I decided against bringing along a telescope but instead decided to carry a pair of binoculars; little and large – my Leica Trinovid 8 x 20 and my Pentax PCF WP II 20 x 60 high-power binocular which was mounted on a lightweight tripod/monopod. In addition, my eldest son brought along his 8 x 32 compact and my younger boy his 6.5 x 21 Papilio II.

But the trip was not entirely about leisure, at least for my wife. As a research technician in the Department of Biological & Environmental Sciences at the University of Stirling, her research group had been given the task of sampling the sands of the beaches all along the northwest coast to measure a number of radioactive isotopes. This work was commissioned by the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA). That meant that we were to visit a number of beaches centred on Poolewe, which worked well for everyone; the boys could enjoy a swim and we could get good walks in along the beach collecting the samples.

Redpoint Beach, Ross-shire. Isle of Skye seen in the distance.

I had decided to bring along my Leica Trinovid 8 x 20 as my main daytime binocular, partly because I had been feeling guilty about treating it more as an ornament than a dedicated field instrument. But as I was to discover, this little binocular is built like a tank(albeit a very small one lol) and was meant to be properly used.  Indeed, I was more than delighted how well it put up with the vagaries of the northwest weather, which can change from bright, calm and sunny one minute, and then wet and windy the next. And during this week away, it endured heating in the Sun, sand, spray and even heavy downpours, coping admirably with the changing conditions. But it wasn’t exactly a free lunch; those difficult conditions meant that I had to clean the optics a couple of times during the week!

No little jessie: the Leica Trinovid 8 x 20 is a rugged pocket glass built for the great outdoors.

Contrary to what some binocular commentators have made, the Leica Trinovid 8 x 20 is easy to use. They claim that the small exit pupil of the binocular(2.5mm) is hard to square on with one’s eyes. But like all things in life, that’s only true for lack of practice. Indeed, I have given mention before that in strong daylight, there is little advantage to using a larger glass as one’s exit pupil shrinks to 2 or 3mm at the most. Furthermore, the best part of the your pupil is the central few millimetres, so when imaging with a small exit pupil you are minimising the optical aberrations inherent to one’s own eyes and this yields fine images only limited by the quality of the glass.

Beaches are excellent places for glassing.

Glassing on the beach is one long adventure. Many types of birds – waders and gulls especially – grace the shoreline – providing many opportunities to study their antics. The  rich colours, contours and grains of rocks, polished by the tides over countless millennia, all kinds of seaweed, beached jelly fish, crabs and other crustaceans, and brightly coloured shells of long-dead sea creatures, present many wonders to the eye, as do the ceaseless activities of the lapping waves constantly yielding their treasures as flotsam, jetsam, lagan and derelict. Each new binocular field presents something new and unfamiliar; endless visual riches provided by our Creator.

The pristine white sands of Melon Udrigle, Ross-shire.

Mair anon…………………………………….

 

De Fideli.

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